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Are CARICOM countries innovating into the fourth industrial revolution?

Ishenkumba Kahwa
Professor of Supramolecular Chemistry, The University of the West Indies
About This Event
November 8, 2022
12:30 pm
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Day 3
  —  
1:55 pm

Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) Policy : A necessary artefact for the SIDs of the Caribbean

Economic development theorists ((Schumpter 1942), (Romer, 1994), (Solow, 1956)) have established the theoretical constructs of scientific and technological developments as foundations to innovative solutions in the form of products, processes and services to long-term socio-economic development and prosperity to high-end economies around the world. It is through the pervasiveness of these innovations within markets which then spurs a sustainable social transformation and long term economic growth within nations.

Day 2
  —  
2:05 pm

BIOPROSPECTING AND BIOPIRACY IN THE CARIBBEAN: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

The goal of harnessing our biodiversity to bring health and wealth to the people living in the Caribbean Region got a boost recently courtesy of a 2016 IUCN project entitled ‘Advancing the Nagoya Protocol in Countries of the Caribbean Region’ that had five components. This project was commissioned by eight governments (Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Trinidad and Tobago) with GEF funding, had UNEP as its Implementing Agency and the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as the Executing Agency.

Day 2
  —  
10:10 am

Comparative Nutritional and Molecular Characterization of Themeda arguens (Piano Grass) from Central Jamaica

Piano grass (Themeda arguens), reputed to have been introduced to Jamaica as packing material in an imported piano1 . There are about 27 varieties of this highly invasive grass/weed worldwide[1] and in Jamaica the species previously identified as Themeda arguens is of concern as it has progressively taken over lawns, pastures and roadsides [1]. The grass is of particular concern to livestock farmers due to its highly invasive and aggressive nature and the concomitant negative effect on livestock productivity, especially during its annual seeding period (November/December – April) [2], when the palatability of the grass diminishes significantly and the seed awns can cause severe damage to the mouth when consumed, and feet of livestock [2], sometimes requiring veterinary intervention.

Day 3
  —  
2:55 pm

A Preliminary Investigation into the Local Management of Isolated Bacteria Implicated in Malodour (Halitosis) in Mandeville, Jamaica

Oral malodour called halitosis, and commonly referred to as ‘bad breath’, is a socially offensive and discriminating occurrence that requires effective management for health improvement and avoidance of debasing stratification of sufferer. Halitosis has been reported to be prevalent in up to 50% of the general population in the USA, and about 6-23% in China. Between 80% and 85% of halitosis cases are caused by intraoral conditions. Literature on halitosis in Jamaica is either scarce or non-existent. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, a common malodour that seemed to be spreading among persons through oral interaction by face-to-face contact with a sufferer was observed among the general populace in Mandeville, Manchester, Jamaica.

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